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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 151-156

Assessment of the relative efficacy of fluoridated toothpaste with and without eggshell-derived calcium oxide in the prevention of primary tooth enamel demineralization: An ex vivo study


1 Senior Lecturer, Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Pacific Dental College, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, D. A. Pandu Memorial RV Dental College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. R V Remi
D/o Shri C. Ravi Raj Kumar, First World Print Pack LLP, Plot No. 5D, 19/6, Mathura Road, Faridabad - 121 006, Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/srmjrds.srmjrds_101_22

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Background: During the cariogenic challenges, the anticaries action of fluoride is limited by the bioavailability of calcium and phosphate in saliva. This mandates the use of additional extrinsic sources of calcium and phosphate to enhance the anticaries potential of fluoride. Aim: This study aimed to assess and compare the efficacy of fluoridated toothpaste with and without eggshell-derived calcium oxide in the prevention of primary tooth enamel demineralization. Materials and Methods: Sixty samples were obtained from 15 extracted primary second molars and allocated to one of four groups: Group A for baseline Vickers hardness testing, Group B was subjected to demineralization only, Group C was treated with fluoridated toothpaste solution, and Group D was treated with fluoridated toothpaste and chicken eggshell powder solution. Surface microhardness and the amount of calcium that was leached into the demineralizing solutions of groups B, C, and D were statistically assessed after 7 days of pH cycling. Results: The mean Vickers hardness values of groups A, B, C, and D were 402.68, 366.28, 392.79, and 395.27, respectively. The mean calcium concentration released into demineralizing solution of groups B, C, and D were 35.52, 29.12, and 27.12, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found between the fluoridated toothpaste with and without eggshell powder. Conclusion: Both fluoridated toothpaste with and without eggshell-derived calcium oxide were equally effective in the prevention of primary tooth enamel demineralization.


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